Organiser:

Dina Gusejnova (UCL- Centre for Transnational History)

Advisory board:

Axel Körner (UCL-Centre for Transnational History), Susan Morrissey (UCL-SSEES) and Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

Web design and virtual panel:

Paul May, UCL

 

List of confirmed participants

Andrew Arsan (Cambridge University)

Kathleen Burk (UCL-History)

Stephen Conway (UCL-History)

Alexander Etkind (European University Institute, Florence)

Zaur Gasimov (Deutsches Orientinstitut, Istanbul)

Marie Gillespie (Open University, London)

Dina Gusejnova (UCL-History)

Axel Körner (UCL-History)

B. Venkat Mani (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Maria Maiofis (Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, Moscow)

Susan Morrissey (UCL-SSEES)

David Owen Norris (Royal Academy of Music, University of Southampton)

Dominique Reill (University of Miami)

Alexander Schmidt (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena)

Olga Sezneva (University of Amsterdam)

Natan Sznaider (Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College)

Galin Tihanov (Queen Mary, London)

Coşkun Tuncer (UCL-History)

Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary, London)

Participants’ bios

Andrew Arsan (Cambridge University)

Andrew Arsan is University Lecturer in Modern Middle Eastern History in the Faculty of History, University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge. He has previously held positions at Birkbeck, University of London and Princeton University. His work focuses on the intellectual, cultural, political and economic histories of the Arabic-speaking Eastern Mediterranean and its diasporas.

Cemil Aydin (University of Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Cemil Aydin’s interests focus on both Modern Middle Eastern History and Modern Asian history, with an emphasis on the international and intellectual histories of the Ottoman and Japanese Empires. He is particularly interested in historical processes that shape transnational racial and civilizational identities, such as Muslim, Asian, African. His research and publications offer new ways to understand the historical roots of the contemporary world order by describing the process of imperial era conflicts and decolonization, especially from the perspective of non-Western actors of the Muslim world and East Asia. Other research and teaching interests deal with questions of internationalism and orientalism, and modern world history.

Kathleen Burk (UCL-History)

Kathleen Burk is Professor Emerita of Modern and Contemporary History at UCL. Her general field is international history, concentrating especially on politics, diplomacy and finance.  She specialises in the twentieth century, although she currently publishes on earlier periods as well.  Her primary area of research is Anglo-American relations, on which she has published three books and a number of articles, but she has also written on the history of merchant banks, on which she has published three books and a number of articles, and on international history generally, on which she has published an edited book and a number of articles.  In 2007, she published a huge book on Anglo-American relations from 1497 to 2003, which was published in the States the following year. She is currently writing a book on the interactions of the British and American empires from 1783 to the present;  in due course, she plans to write a book on the Marshall Plan from the European perspective.  In her off hours, she writes on wine and its history, on which she has published a book and a number of articles.

Stephen Conway (UCL-History)

Stephen Conway is Professor and Head of Department in History at UCL. His main research interest is eighteenth-century Britain and Ireland, and particularly their place in the wider world. He has published books on war, the state and society in Britain, Ireland and North America and on Britain and Ireland’s relationship with continental Europe. He is now working on a project on the continental European contribution to Britain’s empire in the eighteenth century, and European imperial collaboration in the same period. He teaches general courses on British History, 1688-1860, and Colonial and Revolutionary North America. His document-based special subject focuses on the relationship between Britain and its North American colonies between 1760 and 1776 – the opening part of the American Revolution.

 Alexander Etkind (European University Institute, Florence)

Alexander Etkind is the Mikhail Bakhtin Professor of History of Russia-Europe Relations at the EUI. He has his PhD in Psychology from Bekhterev Institute, Leningrad, and another in Slavonic Literatures from the University of Helsinki. Before coming to Cambridge, he taught at the European University at St. Petersburg, with which he continues to collaborate. He was a visiting professor at New York University and Georgetown University, and a resident fellow at Harvard, Princeton, the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington D.C., Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin, and University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Research interests are internal colonization in the Russian Empire, comparative studies of cultural memory, and the dynamics of the protest movement in Russia. In 2010-2013, he directed the European research project, Memory at War: Cultural Dynamics in Poland, Russia, and Ukraine.

Zaur Gasimov (Deutsches Orient-Institut, Istanbul)

Zaur Gasimov is a Researcher at the Deutsches Orient-Institut in Istanbul. He studied International Relations and History in Baku, Berlin and Eichstätt. In 2006-2013 Gasimov taught East European and Russian history at the universities of Eichstaett, Passau and Mainz. His fields of interest include contemporary history of Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Turkey. His current research focuses on the history of anticommunism in Eastern and South-Eastern Europe in the inter-war period. Gasimov received a PhD in history of ideas from the Catholic University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt in 2009. His research has been published in the Jahrbuch für Historische Kommunismusforschung, Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas, and Osteuropa. Gasimov was a research fellow in the Department of Universal History at the Leibniz-Institute of European History (Mainz/Germany) from 2009 to 2013. Since September 2013 he is a research fellow at the Orient Institut Istanbul and explores the circulation of ideas between Russia and Turkey throughout the twentieth century using the example of the intellectuals Ali Bey Hüseynzade, Cafer Seydahmet, and Nimet Akdes Kurat.

 Marie Gillespie (Open University, London)

Marie Gillespie is Professor of Sociology at the Open University. Her interests cluster around South Asian and Middle Eastern diasporas, cultural transnationalism, and changing configurations of audiences and publics in relation to question of citizenship. She researches diaspora and national media cultures comparatively, historically and ethnographically. Recent collaborative include: a large-scale study of the BBC World Service as a multi-diasporic institution; an exploration of the new politics of security via a collaborative ethnography of transnational news cultures in multi-ethnic British households in eight UK cities; a national survey with the BBC on the changing face of British humour, ethnic jokes and comedy. Marie was awarded an AHRC Public Policy Fellowship in 2011 to develop research on the interface between international broadcasting and social media, specifically in relation to the BBC Arabic Services.

Dina Gusejnova (UCL-History)

Dina Gusejnova is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at UCL’s Centre for Transnational History at the Department of History. She specialises in modern intellectual and cultural history and the social history of ideas, with particular interest in twentieth-century cultural internationalism. Her work addresses the relationship between biographical experience and the construction of political identity. Her current research project focuses on positive and negative notions of cosmopolitanism in European and American international cultural institutions during and between the World Wars. She is also completing a book manuscript on aristocratic memory and European identity. Dina holds a doctoral degree from the University of Cambridge. From 2009 to 2011, she was a Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago.

Axel Körner (UCL-History)

Axel Körner is Professor of Modern History and  Deputy Head of Department at UCL’s History Department. He is a cultural and intellectual historian of nineteenth century Europe, with strong interests in social and political developments, historiography as well as methodology and theory. Most of my research deals with Italy, France, Germany and the Habsburg monarchy between the late eighteenth and the early twentieth centuries. Particular fields of interest are transnational history, the European Revolutions of 1848 and the history of nineteenth century opera. He is also the founding director of UCL’s Centre for Transnational History, where his own work concentrates on the relationship between nations and states as well as the transfer of ideas and culture. His recent publications include Politics of Culture in Liberal Italy (Routledge, 2009), 1848: A European Revolution? International Ideas and National Memories of 1848 (Macmillan, 2000), and, as editor, America Imagined. Explaining the United States in Nineteenth-Century Europe and Latin America (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).

Maria Maiofis (Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, Moscow)

Maria Maiofis is a senior research fellow of the School for Humanities Research at the Russian Academy of National Economy and Public Administration. A scholar of language and literature by training, she received her PhD at the Russian University of the Humanities (RGGU) in 2002, and has worked as editor at Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie journal (2000-2009). Her first book Vozzvanie k Evrope: Literaturnoe obshchestvo “Arzamas” I rossiiskii modernisatsionnyi proekt 1815-1818 godov” [An appeal to Europe: the literary circle “Arzamas” and the project of Russian modernization, 1815-1818” was published by NLO in 2008. She is now working on a collective project devoted to the history of Soviet education.

B. Venkat Mani (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

B. Venkat Mani is Associate Professor in the Department of German at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Born and raised in India, he received his BA (Honors) (1993) and MA (1995) in German Studies at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He came to the US in 1995, as a PhD student in German Studies at Stanford University (1995-2001). He started as Assistant Professor at UW-Madison in 2001 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2007. His first book, Cosmopolitical Claims: Turkish-German Literatures from Nadolny to Pamuk (University of Iowa Press, 2007) is a study of home, belonging, and cultural citizenship as expressed in German and Turkish novels at the end of the 20th century. He continues to research and teach courses on literature through contexts of migration, cosmopolitanism, transnationalism, and postcolonialism.

Susan Morrissey (UCL-SSEES)

Susan Morrissey is Professor of Russian History at SSEES. After receiving her PhD from UC Berkeley, she worked in the US and Germany before coming to London in 1998. Her research explores the boundaries between cultural, social, and political history, and she enjoys thinking conceptually and comparatively about history. Her research spans multiple topics – student movements, suicide, mass culture, subjectivity, and political violence. Her publications include Suicide and the Body Politic in Imperial Russia (CUP 2006, 2011) and ‘The “Apparel of Innocence”: Toward a Moral Economy of Terrorism in Late Imperial Russia’ (Journal of Modern History, 2012). She has received fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, and the British Academy.

David Owen Norris (Royal Academy of Music, University of Southampton)

David Owen Norris is a pianist, broadcaster & composer. He was Organ Scholar at Keble College, Oxford, leaving with a First in Music and a Composition Scholarship to study at the Royal Academy of Music, where he won the Dove Prize, and privately in Paris. He was a repetiteur at the Royal Opera House, harpist at the Royal Shakespeare Company, Artistic Director of the Petworth Festival & the Cardiff International Festival, Gresham Professor of Music, and Chairman of the Steans Institute for Singers at the Ravinia Festival in Chicago. He’s a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music and the Royal College of Organists, and an Honorary Fellow of Keble College, Oxford. His Symphony was premiered in May this year, and his oratorio Prayerbook was recorded in the autumn of 2012 for EM Records. His work as a concert pianist has taken him round the world for forty years – ‘quite possibly the most interesting pianist in the world!’ says the Toronto Globe & Mail, while his latest piano solo CD got a double-five-star review in BBC Music Magazine. He was the first winner of the Gilmore Artist Award. Among his many contributions is a special series for BBC 4 called Ipod. David Owen Norris asks which tunes famous historical figures would have had on their iPods. He recreates their favourite songs with help from academics and musicians.

Dominique Reill (University of Miami)

Dominique Kirchner Reill  is Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami. She specializes in Modern European history with particular emphases on the Nineteenth Century, post-World War I Europe, post-World War II Europe, regionalism, nationalism, southern Europe, Italy, the Balkans, as well as cultural and intellectual history. Born in Los Angeles, she was raised and educated in both California and the former BRD (West Germany). She received her Bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley in 1997, during which time she also studied at the Università di Bologna. She also studied Croatian language and literature at the Filozofski fakultet in Zagreb and Serbian language and literature in Belgrade. She received her Ph.D. with Distinction from Columbia University in 2007. Prior to coming to Miami, she taught at both Columbia and New York Universities. She received tenure within the University of Miami’s History Department in 2013, when she was also awarded a Certificate of Excellence from the University of Miami’s College of Arts & Sciences in recognition of her scholarly and creative activities

Alexander Schmidt (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena)

Alexander Schmidt, Dr phil (2005), Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, is Junior Professor for Intellectual History at Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena. Between 1998 and 2004, he was a scholar of the presitigous Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes, and from 2004 to 2008, researcher at the project “Ereignis Weimar-Jena. Kultur um 1800” at jena. In 2009, he was Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh. His first book was Vaterlandsliebe und Religionskonflikt. Politische Diskurse im Alten Reich 1555-1648 [Patriotism and Religious conflict. Political Discourses in the Old Reich 1555-1648] [Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions, 126) (Leiden 2007).

Olga Sezneva (University of Amsterdam)

Olga Sezneva is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Amsterdam. Her main interests lie at the intersection of migration, urban studies (with a particular focus on urban design and environment), cultural sociology (including social memory, intellectual property and global media markets), and qualitative methods of research. She also serves as a Co-Director of the Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies (UvA).

Natan Sznaider (Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College)

Natan Sznaider Professor of Sociology at the Academic College of Tel-Aviv-Yaffo in Israel. He is conducting research in the fields of cultural sociology and political theory. In summer 2010, his latest book, Memory and Human Rights, will be published by Penn State University Press.  After visits in each of the last two years, Natan Sznaider will be at the CAS once again in July 2012 as a guest. He is part of the work group of the CAS research focus “Methodological Cosmopolitanism” with Prof. Ulrich Beck from the Sociological Institute of the LMU.

Galin Tihanov (Queen Mary, London)
Galin Tihanov holds the George Steiner Chair of Comparative Literature at Queen Mary, University of London. He was previously Professor of Comparative Literature and Intellectual History and founding co-director of the Research Institute for Cosmopolitan Cultures at the University of Manchester. His most recent research has been on cosmopolitanism, exile, and transnationalism. His publications include three books and eight (co)edited volumes, as well as over a hundred articles on German, Russian, French, and Central-European intellectual and cultural history and on cultural and literary theory. Some of his work has been translated into Bulgarian, Danish, French, German, Hungarian, Macedonian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, and Slovene. Tihanov is winner, with Evgeny Dobrenko, of the Efim Etkind Prize for Best Book on Russian Culture (2012), awarded for their co-edited A History of Russian Literary Theory and Criticism: The Soviet Age and Beyond (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). He is Honorary President of the ICLA Committee on Literary Theory and member of Academia Europaea.

 Coşkun Tuncer (UCL-History)

Coşkun Tuncer is Lecturer in Modern Economic History at UCL. Previously he was a Fellow in Economic History at the London School of Economics, where he had been teaching since 2008. Between 2009 and 2013 he conducted research on long-term European market integration for the European University Institute, and worked in the financial sector as a historical researcher. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics in 2011 after completing his BA, MSc and MPhil degrees in Turkey and Greece. His PhD thesis on creditors’ response to the sovereign debt crises and international financial supervision during the nineteenth century is due to be published in History of Finance Series of Palgrave Macmillan in 2014. His research focuses on the economic and financial history of the late Ottoman Empire, long-term economic change in the Middle East and Southeast Europe, history of financial markets, and evolution of international financial and monetary institutions from the nineteenth century to the present.

Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary, London)

Georgios Varouxakis is Reader in History of Political Thought at Queen Mary, University of London. He studied History in Athens, Greece, and then came to England, where he completed an MA in Legal and Political Theory at University College London [UCL] and then a PhD in History at UCL. He taught political theory and history at Aston University. His research interests include, among others, the history of political thought (British and French, 19th-20th centuries), the history of international political thought, John Stuart Mill’s political thought and philosophy, political thought on nationalism, patriotism and cosmopolitanism, intellectual history of the idea of ‘Europe’ and attitudes towards ‘Europe’ and the idea of ‘the West’, Anglo-French intellectual relations and mutual perceptions, and political thought on empire and imperialism. His books include Liberty Abroad: J. S. Mill on International Relations (Cambridge, August 2013), Mill on Nationality (2002), and Victorian Political Thought on France and the French (Palgrave Macmillan, 2002).

Others tbc

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